Volunteer Workday


Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau

“I have been told, “Aunty, it’s going to take a long time and $5 million to be able to restore the rest of the wall and pond,” remarks Ali‘i Pauahi President Kehaulani Lum. “And I said, no it won’t, it won’t take that long. And not that much, if everybody comes together, it will cost nothing. And it will be done. This is generational work,” Kehaulani states. “In addition to our ‘ohana, our civic club and dear friends, kōkua has come from the ‘Aiea Community Association, Living Life Source Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, lineal descendants, KUA and our fellow hui members, ‘Aiea High School, Pearlridge Shopping Center, the Honolulu Friends, residents of ‘Aiea and Kalauao, the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Holani Hana, residents of McGrew Point, and many many children and families of `Ewa, we have cleared 50% of the invasive plants, rebuilt half of the original wall, and constructed a new hale for educational and healing purposes. Yet, there is more to do.”

Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau is a type of Loko Kuapā, which includes an outer stone wall, sluice gates, or mākāhā, and the shore as the inner boundary. The mākāhā and walls are how smaller fish pass into the pond, how bigger fish are trapped, and how the pond is filtered and circulated. After they built the wall, oysters started coming back, and can be found along the bottom of the wall. During Kalanimanu‘ia’s time up into the 1900s, nehu fish were raised in the pond both as baitfish and for eating. With a small canoe full of nehu, one would be able to catch 400 to 500 aku from the deep ocean.

Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau


About the organizer

This 400-year old royal Hawaiian fishpond, Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau, located in the Kalauao ahupua‘a in the ‘Ewa moku on the mokupuni of O‘ahu, is a beautiful reminder of the peace, healing, and lōkahi Hawai‘i once had. It was home to Mo‘i Wahine Kalanimanuia, who reigned peacefully over the island of O‘ahu in the 1400s. This 6.34 acre loko kuapā, located in the Pā`aiau ‘ili of the Kalauao ahupuaʻa, is listed on the National Historic Register. The sacred site is currently stewarded and restored with the loving hands of many, as a community-based partnership between the U.S.Navy, the Ali‘i Pauahi Hawaiian Civic Club, the ‘Aiea Community Association, the descendants and residents of Pā`aiau, ‘Aiea and Kalauao, and the larger community.

Fri 6/21/2024 10am-3pm

  • One Time Commitment
  • Flexible Schedule
  • Specific Location
Good For

Kids, Teens, Families, Students, Visitors

Activity Type

Outdoor, Farms & Gardens, Help Animals, Help Plants & Nature, Cleanup

Cause

Environmental Conservation, Cultural Preservation, Community Engagement, Non Profit Support

Requirements

RSVP Required

Volunteer Workday


Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau

“I have been told, “Aunty, it’s going to take a long time and $5 million to be able to restore the rest of the wall and pond,” remarks Ali‘i Pauahi President Kehaulani Lum. “And I said, no it won’t, it won’t take that long. And not that much, if everybody comes together, it will cost nothing. And it will be done. This is generational work,” Kehaulani states. “In addition to our ‘ohana, our civic club and dear friends, kōkua has come from the ‘Aiea Community Association, Living Life Source Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, lineal descendants, KUA and our fellow hui members, ‘Aiea High School, Pearlridge Shopping Center, the Honolulu Friends, residents of ‘Aiea and Kalauao, the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Holani Hana, residents of McGrew Point, and many many children and families of `Ewa, we have cleared 50% of the invasive plants, rebuilt half of the original wall, and constructed a new hale for educational and healing purposes. Yet, there is more to do.”

Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau is a type of Loko Kuapā, which includes an outer stone wall, sluice gates, or mākāhā, and the shore as the inner boundary. The mākāhā and walls are how smaller fish pass into the pond, how bigger fish are trapped, and how the pond is filtered and circulated. After they built the wall, oysters started coming back, and can be found along the bottom of the wall. During Kalanimanu‘ia’s time up into the 1900s, nehu fish were raised in the pond both as baitfish and for eating. With a small canoe full of nehu, one would be able to catch 400 to 500 aku from the deep ocean.

Fri 6/21/2024 10am-3pm

  • One Time Commitment
  • Flexible Schedule
  • Specific Location
Good For

Kids, Teens, Families, Students, Visitors

Activity Type

Outdoor, Farms & Gardens, Help Animals, Help Plants & Nature, Cleanup

Cause

Environmental Conservation, Cultural Preservation, Community Engagement, Non Profit Support

Requirements

RSVP Required

Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau


About the organizer

This 400-year old royal Hawaiian fishpond, Loko Iʻa Pāʻaiau, located in the Kalauao ahupua‘a in the ‘Ewa moku on the mokupuni of O‘ahu, is a beautiful reminder of the peace, healing, and lōkahi Hawai‘i once had. It was home to Mo‘i Wahine Kalanimanuia, who reigned peacefully over the island of O‘ahu in the 1400s. This 6.34 acre loko kuapā, located in the Pā`aiau ‘ili of the Kalauao ahupuaʻa, is listed on the National Historic Register. The sacred site is currently stewarded and restored with the loving hands of many, as a community-based partnership between the U.S.Navy, the Ali‘i Pauahi Hawaiian Civic Club, the ‘Aiea Community Association, the descendants and residents of Pā`aiau, ‘Aiea and Kalauao, and the larger community.

Sign Up